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From the manuscript Volume V, written in 1986 just after Vol. III (under similar circumstances, in Zurich)—but (even now) not yet ready (due to surrounding time conditions) to be published in full. However, some selections have been published in Vols. I & IV[1]:

And each unseen lotus
followed by
its hidden
messages

On the tennis court the match continues
On the tennis court the ball in play
and then, time to change servers
the ball into a new court

In whose court?
In OUR court
In OUR court
SERVE ANTES

A Left Turn
Rosa
Velt

Now completely convinced of the story
completely convinced of its truth

" . . . laugh about this someday in the
Aey-rie"

The Earth's coming of Age as a
Plan-
NET

The arrival of a new consciousness
alien
that consciousness sometimes at odds with
this world—
was the situation
the state
the shock
that caused the opening of the
next act of
the Co-
me-
Dia

The Old Man's
EX-
IT
Time for the Old Man's
EXIT

Robert Schumann
at the p-IAN-o
ClarISE
wanting her to win
come,
pair
Résonne
re-cord a consciousness
pre-O
pre-The End
change Before the End

change the game
the Spiel-
Ling

Come pari Son
a dual with
the Son
come
pari
Son
help Son
win
gag-
ne
r

a shared rêve
REV-
olution
chakras like cages now opened
row CO CO

Guides adding Dim MENTIONS
how often they had wanted to speak
spoken and not
BEEN HEARD
not part of the Earth's tradition
BEEN HERD

accepted a minimal definition

a whole Earth to
UN-
EARTHE

reality of
THE EARTH's POSITION




From Babaji and the 18 Siddha Kriya Yoga Tradition, by M. Govindan (1991, Montreal: Kriya Yoga Publications), pp. 116-117:

"In the fifth century  B.C., Confusius met Lao-Tzu Bo-Yang and afterwards said of him:

            "I know a bird can fly, a fish can swim, and an animal can run. For that which runs, a net can be fashioned; for that which swims, a line can be strung. But the ascent of a Dragon on the wind into heaven is something which is beyond my knowledge. Today I have met Lao-Tzu, who is perhaps like a Dragon.Among the Chinese, particularly, the Taoists, the Dragon is the symbol of Kundalini Shakti, the primordial force."



From Love in Transition, Vol. I., p. 29:

So if we see the world as a Thought FORM
the Fourth Dimension is a
meta4

The  [solar] oven where the cooking, the cake, was timed a
FOUR[2]

Cook-key
clé  
clay OVen
ready to come out in the op-
N
The GOT TOW

Now what could be cooking
in a meta
FOUR, TURNED ON HIGH
EN HAUT
IN O
the HAUT in the END
the N-O now
EN HAUT
a turned-around spelling coming in
in
a
META-
4




 From Love in Transition, Vol. I, the essay A Man Called Milton: Experiments in Consciousness, pp. 6, 12-13:

            Carl Jung wrote (in Man and His Symbols) of a "shadow of death" (1978 ed., p. 63). In what I now picture as a full, frothing, future-prognosticating wave, this "shadow of death" preceded [Milton] Klonsky's death for a year in dreams, strongly indicating (but unbelieved or –decoded by me) the death was coming. (Klonsky had said, "I believe time is all one tense: a burgeoning present. And foresight isn't, by the way foresight. It's immediate sight.") Jung's words were written after age 80 (completely approximately 10 days before onset of his fatal illness); the time frame for pronouncing these words was, for Jung, in addition, after a near-death experience (not to mention having had a practice of alternating between personality Nr. 1 and 2, a time- and nontime-bound dimension of himself.

            A mind (Klonsky's) which "compressed the world to the space between his hairline and the bridge of his nose,"[3] who read and mentally retained libraries of books, which he assimilated, where did it go (Krim: "he was indirect, elusive, paradoxical, frowning, iceberg-cheerless often," p. 69). Did that mind disappear—"muck"—merge with the Earth? Or did it gravitate? The man who told me, his face coming close, insistent, in a vibration I found myself always in in his presence: "I was a crazy kid, You know what I was crazed by?Immortality"—was he immortal?

            I came as the recorder of a wave—the physical point[4] that observed it at the collapse of the wave, where the point of the story and the story itself become visible. . . .

            To begin chronologically: at two years old, I remember being at the top of the stairs at my home, listening to the people below. I wanted to walk down. I could. Only, I was afraid. I later understood this to be a photograph of my path; to walk down the stairs to the ground, from a listener position, an observer, on the stairs. I particularly wanted to see how my father's friends fanned out their hands at the card table (I even sleptwalked down)—how they hid the cards. How they played them.

REFERENCES

Brigs, J., & D. Peat (1989). Turbulent Mirror: An Illustrated Guide to Chaos Theory and the Science of Wholeness. New  York: Harper & Row.

Davies, P. (1982). Other Worlds: Space, Superspace and the Quantum Universe. New York: Simon & Schuster/Touchstone.

Jung, C. G. (1978 ed.). "Approaching the Unconscious." In C. G. Jung, et al, Man and His Symbols (pp. 1-94). London: Picador.

Krim, S. (1991). See p. 1, "Icon-ography" section in the Website, as well as "Archives" & "Having Tried To Write."

[1] Forms of the following non-English expressions are used, with partial definitions: Cervantes; ris  (Fr) ("is" pronounced long  "e") = "laugh"  (from the verb rire, pronounced "rear"); come(Sp) (pronounced "co-may") = "eat" (from the verb "comer"); dia (It) = "day"; Comedia= a name for the Divine Comedy, by Dante Alighieri;  résonner (Fr) = "to sound, clang"; spiel (Fl) = "game";  pari (Fr) = "bet"; gagner (Fr) (prounced "gahn—yea") = "to win"; rêve (Fr) = "dream."

[2] Non-English words here include clé  (Fr) (pronounced "clay") = "key";  four (Fr) = "oven"; en haut (Fr) ("haut" pronounced like "O") = "above," "on high"; gâteau (Fr) (pronounced like "got tow") = "cake."

[3] Seymour Krim, Ibid. (see "Icon-ography").

[4] The wave in quantum physics is described as a probability wave of energetically interacting influences while in wave form, before it collapses into the fait accompli of fact (cf. Davies, 1982, pp. 64, 67, 69, 102, 130). Also of relevance is Briggs & Peat (1989), on the soliton wave, which was first identified in the 19th century in Scotland by J. S. Russel, an engineer, as he walked beside a body of water. Because of connections that are internal, nonlinear, this type of wave, when passing through another wave, emerges unbroken, still intact. It has become an important principle in modern science, resulting in the creation of such terms as the "optical soliton," and instructive in the understanding of nonlinear interrelational dynamics.


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